The Song of the Warrior-Judge

From this week’s parshah:

וַתִּקַּח מִרְיָם הַנְּבִיאָה אֲחוֹת אַהֲרֹן, אֶת-הַתֹּף–בְּיָדָהּ; וַתֵּצֶאןָ כָל-הַנָּשִׁים אַחֲרֶיהָ, בְּתֻפִּים וּבִמְחֹלֹת. וַתַּעַן לָהֶם, מִרְיָם: שִׁירוּ לַיקוָק כִּי-גָאֹה גָּאָה, סוּס וְרֹכְבוֹ רָמָה בַיָּם.1

From the haftarah:

וַתָּשַׁר דְּבוֹרָה, וּבָרָק בֶּן-אֲבִינֹעַם, בַּיּוֹם הַהוּא, לֵאמֹר.2

How could Devorah have sung together with Barak, in apparent contravention of the principle of קול באשה ערוה? Rav Yissachar Ber Eilenberg suggests Divine dispensation:

תוכחת מגולה יפה ומעולה אדבר עם בחורים וגם בתולות זקנים עם נערים ובפרט עם נשים נשואות שהם מזמרות ומשמיעות קול שיר בזמירות בשבת עם בחורים זקנים עם נערים יחד. ואינם משימין אל לבם שהיא מצוה הבאה לידי עבירה חמורה …
ואל תשיבני מדכתיב ותשר דבורה וברק בן אבינועם וגו’ כמו שנשאלתי מן אשה משכלת. כי יש לומר על פי הדיבור שאני וכיוצא בזה ממש תירצו התוספות בפרק החולץ …3

Rav Efraim Zalman Margolis explains that Devorah merely composed her wonderful poem, but did not actually sing it vocally before a male audience:

ושמעתי שלכך לא כתיב ששרתה יעל לפי שאמרו (מגילה טו.) יעל בקולה מביאה לידי הרהור וזנות, מה שאין כן דבורה שפיר אמרה לפי מה שכתבו הפוסקים דדוקא לקריאת שמע איתמר
אמנם נראה דבלאו הכי אין ראיה מ”ותשר דבורה”, שעיקרה לא נאמר אלא נוסח השירה והמליצה הנפלאה, אבל לא נזכר ששרתה בקול לפני אנשים.4

I mentioned these sources in the introduction to a miscellaneous lecture I recently gave on poetry, song and grammar in the Jewish tradition; it is available, along with my notes, at the Internet Archive. [It is based on a series of essays I published about five years ago on the Seforim Blog titled “Wine, Women and Song: Some Remarks On Poetry and Grammar”: part I; part II; part III.]

In a follow up post, we shall, בג”ה, discuss the problem of Miriam’s singing.

  1. שמות טו:כ-כא []
  2. שופטים ה:א []
  3. באר שבע, ספר באר מים חיים אות ג, הובא באליה רבה סימן ע”ה סוף אות ה []
  4. מטה אפרים, דיני קדיש יתום, שער ד’ סעיף ח’ באלף למטה []

1 thought on “The Song of the Warrior-Judge”

  1. Of course, the real truth is that kol isha was only invented millennia later by the Talmudic period. Tanach has many references to female singers, especially in the reign of King Solomon. The “explanations” you post are, let us be honest, mere apologetics that convince no one. You may as well also suggest that there was a hastily erected portable mechitzah set up so that the men couldn’t hear the women. (Where did they get it from? Why, Jacob saw with ruach ha-kodesh that it would be needed and brought it down with him.) It’s all fun and nice to engage in these little games, but let’s not pretend that we’re concerned with the truth here.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *