Justice Denied Revisited

Around this time last year, we discussed the controversy over the theological correctness of the phrase “ולוקח נפשות במשפט” added to ברכת המזון in a house of mourning, in light of the Biblical phrase “וְיֵשׁ נִסְפֶּה בְּלֹא מִשְׁפָּט” and the Talmudic assertion that “יש מיתה בלא חטא”. I have long had a vague sense of perplexity about this controversy: are there not other similar liturgical assertions that all deaths are the working of Divine justice? I never came up with a concrete example, but I recently discovered that Rav Refael Yosef Hazan does discuss one:

כתב הטור בסימן רכ”ד וז”ל

הרואה קברי ישראל [אומר ברוך אתה ד’ אלקינו מלך העולם אשר יצר אתכם בדין וזן אתכם בדין וכלכל אתכם בדין] והמית אתכם בדין

[ו]כך היא הגירסא בהרי”ף והרמב”ם ע”כ וברבינו יונה הביא דבריו מרן הבית יוסף דאף על גב דיש מיתה בלא חטא אפילו הכי דינו דין אמת יע”ש

וקשיא טובא שהרי הרי”ף בפרק שלשה שאכלו גבי ברכת האבל כתב כבה”ג דלא אמרינן לוקח נפשות במשפט וכתבו רבינו יונה והרא”ש שהטעם שלהם דקיימא לן יש מיתה בלא חטא והם ז”ל חלקו עליהם דאף על פי כן כל דרכיו משפט יע”ש. ואם כן קשה להרי”ף איך כתב בברכה זו והמית אתכם בדין הפך מה שכתב בברכת האבל. וגם לרבינו יונה והרא”ש קשה איך לא הקשו מדבריו בברכה זו וכן קשה להרמב”ם דגבי ברכת האבל כתב כהרי”ף וכאן כתב הנוסח והמית אתכם בדין. וכן קשה להבית יוסף דבסימן קפ”ט כתב דנקטינן כהרי”ף והרמ[ב”ם] ובסימן זה כתב דברי רבינו יונה בסתם והם תרי דסתרי וגם נוסחתינו בברכת האבל שלא לומר במשפט ובברכה זו אנו אומרים והמית אתכם בדין וצ”ע.

ואחר החיפוש ראיתי בסדר רב עמרם גאון כת”י שהביא נוסח ברכה זו ואין בה והמית אתכם בדין כנוסח גירסת הרי”ף ושאר פוסקים יע”ש וצ”ע לדין1

Here is my weekly halachah column for this week:

Parashas Haazinu (32:4) contains the declaration: “The Rock! – perfect is His work, for all His paths are justice; a G-d of faith without iniquity, righteous and fair is He.”

We have previously discussed (this column, parashas Haazinu 5777) the debate over the language “[He] takes souls with justice … for all His paths are justice” added to the Blessing after Meals in the home of a mourner: some authorities reject this phrase, due to the Talmudic declaration that “there is death without error [cheit]”, while others defend it based on our parashah’s assertion that “all His paths are justice”.

Another liturgical context in which this tension is manifest is the blessing recited upon seeing graves of Jews. Here the normative, virtually unanimously accepted phrasing is: “Blessed are You, Hashem, … who formed you with justice … and killed you with justice [ba’din] …” (Berachos 58b and rishonim there, Tur and Shulchan Aruch OC end of siman 224). R. Refael Yosef Chazan is quite perplexed by the fact that even those authorities who object to the phrase “[He] takes souls with justice” on the grounds that it is theologically incorrect, apparently have no problem with the phrase “and killed you with justice” (Chikrei Lev OC 1:49).

As noted in our previous column, an additional argument against the claim that all deaths can be considered just is from the declaration in Mishlei that “some are consumed without justice”, and the Talmud’s support thereof with a remarkable anecdote of the underling of the Angel of Death confusing his master’s description of his target and taking the life of the wrong woman by mistake. This same argument is advanced by Maharil in his halachic analysis of a question with much higher stakes than mere liturgical correctness: is flight from a plague-infested area prudent, or actually prohibited? Maharil strongly endorses flight, and in response to his correspondent’s apparent concern that this is an attempt to thwart Hashem’s will, he counters that death is not always a result of His will, since “some are consumed without justice”, and infers from the aforementioned Talmudic account that “sometimes the agent errs” (Shut. Maharil #41)!

  1. שו”ת חקרי לב חלק א’ (או”ח) סימן מ”ט []

Theft and Thaumaturgy II

The previous post in this series discussed the idea that Rachel stole Lavan’s תרפים in order to prevent them from informing Lavan of her family’s flight; this post discusses the other main traditional explanation of her theft, that the תרפים were idols worshipped by Lavan, and Rachel stole them to wean him from idolatry.

בראשית רבה

והיא לא נתכוונה אלא לשם שמים. אמרה: מה אנא מיזיל לי, ונשבוק הדין סבא בקלקוליה?! לפיכך הוצרך הכתוב לומר: ותגנוב רחל את התרפים אשר לאביה:1

רש”י

להפריש את אביה מעבודה זרה נתכוונה:2

The simple version of this approach is that Rachel’s goal was practical: by removing the objects of Lavan’s worship from his possession, his ability to worship them would be thus thwarted. Abarbanel seems to have so understood Hazal, and he rejects their interpretation of Rachel’s motive (in favor of basically that of the previous post), essentially accusing them of naïveté: he considers it preposterous that a daughter might alter her elderly father’s religious convictions, and insists that Rachel would have been quite foolish to have had such a hope:

איך נתפתה רחל לגנוב את התרפים אשר לאביה האם חשבה להרחיקו מעכו”ם כדבריהם ז”ל באמת סכלות גדולה יהיה זה לה בחשבה כי לעת זקנתו בתו תטה את לבו ועם היות שנגנבו ממנו התרפים יעשה לו אלהים אחרים תחתיהם3

It is perhaps to counter this objection (as Dr. Alexander Klein suggests) that R. Hananel explains that Rachel’s action was not a pragmatic attempt to prevent her father from worshipping his idols, but rather a theological demonstration of their worthlessness: she meant to lead her father to the realization that “there can be no substance to a god who is stolen”:

ורבינו חננאל כתב כי מה שגנבה אותם כדי שיחזור בו ושיאמר אלוה הגנוב אין בו ממש, כדבר יואש שאמר (שופטים ו’) אם אלהים הוא ירב לו כי נתץ מזבחו, וכמו שאמר הכתוב (יחזקאל כ”ח) האמור תאמר אלהים אני לפני הורגך ואתה אדם ולא א-ל ביד מחללך:4

Vandalizing Televisions

In any event, Rachel’s act may serve as precedent to justify the theft or destruction of property in order to prevent the commission of sin, and it is indeed invoked as such by R. Moshe Shternbuch, in the course of his consideration of the case of a baal teshuvah who continually (!) vandalizes the television at his parents’ home in order to prevent the family from watching it. R. Shternbuch begins by conceding that the prohibition of watching television is “very severe”, but is nevertheless unwilling to grant unequivocal permission to vandalize the television, noting that such vigilantism is often counterproductive. He points out that Rachel did not include Jacob in her scheme, and he ultimately objected to what she had done, with his imprecation against the perpetrator ultimately causing Rachel’s death!

שאלה: בעל תשובה הנמצא בבית אביו ויש שם טלויזיא ונוהג הבן להזיק את המכשיר לעתים תכופות כדי שלא יסתכלו בו בני המשפחה, ושואל אם מותר לו להזיק כן.

הנה האיסור להסתכל בטלויזיא הוא חמור מאד, ומאביזרייהו דעריות הוא …

אמנם נחלקו הקצות החושן והנתיבות המשפט (חו”מ סימן ג’) אם הדין כפייה לקיים המצוות מסור לבית דין דוקא או לכל אחד ואחד, … ונראה שצדקו אלו הפוסקים שהצריכו בית דין דוקא לכפייה … ואף אם מעיקר הדין מוטל על כל אחד ואחד, נראה שאין להפקיר ממון ישראל בחנם, וצריכים התייעצות ופסק מבית דין, דלפעמים בדרך לקיחת ממונו גורם ריחוק יותר, ואין כל אחד ואחד יכול ליקח ממון חבירו בטענה שמתכוין לשם שמים להפרישו מאיסור. …

ובברכות דחסידי קדמאי … ומשמע שראוי לקרוע בגדי פריצות ולשלם במקום שיש חילול השם וכל שכן טלויזיא שמטמא עוד יותר, ורחל גנבה התרפים של אביה להפרישו מעבודה זרה וכמבואר ברש”י …

אמנם דעתי נוטה שכל פעולה צריך שאלת חכם, וגם רב אדא בר אהבה אמר “מתון מתון וכו’”, ואפילו רחל אמנו שגנבה התרפים מאביה להפרישו מעבודה זרה והעלימה מיעקב שהקפיד בדבר, ואמר “עם אשר תמצא את אלהיך לא יחיה” הרי שלא היתה דעתו מסכמת לזה, ולבסוף נענשה רחל על ידי זה שמתה, … ולפעמים לא הגיע עדיין הזמן להפרישו מטלויזיא, ופעולה שלא בזמנה עלולה לפעמים לקלקל, ולכל עת ולכל זמן, ובעצת חכמים ישכון אור ואין לזוז מדבריהם.5

[Translations / paraphrases of R. Shternbuch’s responsum: here and here.]

Spilling Out חלב עכו”ם

R. Avraham Weinfeld was asked about a yeshivah that persisted upon serving its students חלב עכו”ם, despite the pleas of local G-d fearing individuals, until one zealot spilled out one morning’s milk delivery, to protest the sinners and raise public awareness of the infraction. The yeshivah administration responded by suing for the loss. As R. Weinfeld summarizes, “the basic question is whether one who damages another’s property in order to prevent him from sinning is liable for compensation or not”:

שאלה, מעשה שהיה בעיר אחת בישיבה קטנה נתנו בכל יום להילדים לשתות חלב שחלבו עכו”ם, ויראי ד’ שבעיר בקשו מהנהלת הישיבה חדול מזה ולא הועילו בבקשתם ודחו אותם מיום אל יום עד שקם איש אחד וקנא קנאת ד’, ובבוקר אחד כאשר הביאו החלב עכו”ם אל הישיבה שפך את כל החלב ארצה, כדי למחות בעוברי עבירה ולעורר דעת הקהל אל האיסור, אך מנהלי הישיבה תבעו אותו לשלם ההפסד כדין מזיק, ונשאלתי אם יש ממש בטענתם, ותוכן השאלה אם המזיק ממון חבירו כדי לאפרושי מאיסורא חייב לשלם או לא.6

R. Weinfeld has a lengthy analysis of the question, inclining toward the zealous defendant, and concludes by noting that “with the aid of Heaven, the protest was effective, and they henceforth distributed חלב ישראל”:

ובעז”ה הועילה המחאה ומאז הנהיגו לחלק חלב ישראל ושלום על ישראל.

My parashah lecture and weekly halachah column for פרשת ויצא covered the topics and (most of the) sources of this and the previous post. Here is the column:

In parashas Vayeitzei, the Torah relates that Rachel stole her father Lavan’s “terafim” as she fled from him. What were these mysterious terafim, and what was Rachel’s motive and justification for stealing them? The midrashim and classic commentators offer two general approaches:

  1. The terafim were magical devices capable of speech, and Rachel stole them to prevent them from revealing to Lavan the flight of Yaakov and his household (Tanchuma #12, Chizkuni).
  2. The terafim were idols of Lavan, and Rachel stole them to cure him of idol worship (Bereishis Rabah 74:5, Rashi).

The latter approach seems to imply the legitimacy of theft as a means to prevent someone from sinning. R. Moshe Shternbuch does indeed adduce Rachel’s action in support of the permissibility of destroying property that is being used in the commission of sin, although he subsequently points out that Yaakov apparently disagreed with her decision, and that Rachel was eventually punished by death for her action (Shut. Teshuvos Vehanhagos 1:368).

In the course of his analysis, R. Shternbuch cites a dispute between the Ketzos Hachoshen and the Nesivos Hamishpat over whether the Talmudic rule approving the use of force to prevent someone from sinning (Bava Kama 28a) is limited to the courts, or endorses even vigilante action by private citizens. R. Shternbuch sides with the Ketzos that the authority to use force is the sole prerogative of the court, but he seems to overlook the fact that the Ketzos subsequently clarifies his position and concedes that even a private citizen may use force to prevent someone from actively violating a prohibition (such as eating non-kosher food), and it is only the use of force to compel someone to act in fulfillment of a positive commandment (such as taking the four species) that is limited to the court (see Ketzos, Nesivos and Meshoveiv Nesivos at the beginning of siman 3).

The lecture and accompanying handouts are available at the Internet Archive.

See also:

  1. בראשית רבה פרשה ע”ד סימן ה’ []
  2. רש”י בראשית לא:יט, ועיין גם מדרש תנחומא פרשת ויצא סימן י”ב []
  3. אברבנאל שם שאלה י”א []
  4. רבינו בחיי שם []
  5. שו”ת תשובות והנהגות חלק א’ סימן שס”ח []
  6. שו”ת לב אברהם סימן ע”ה []

Ascetics, Aesthetics, and Cosmetics

My halachah column for this past year’s פרשת נשא:

In Parashas Naso (6:11), a Nazarite is commanded to bring a sin-offering. As we have noted in previous years, the Talmud (Bava Kama 91b) cites an explanation that this is to atone for the sin of having (unnecessarily) deprived himself of the enjoyment of wine. Elsewhere (Nedarim 10a), the Talmud derives from this that one who engages in (discretionary) fasting is called a sinner.

But in yet another discussion of the topic, the Talmud (Taanis 11a-b) again begins by citing the opinion that the Nazarite and the faster are considered sinners, but then proceeds to cite two other opinions: one that considers them both ‘holy’, and one that invokes the term ‘pious’ (although Rashi and Tosafos actually disagree whether it is the faster, or the one who refrains from fasting, who is termed pious).

The Tosafos complicate matters even further, noting that the same sage (Shmuel) who maintains that the faster is considered a sinner, elsewhere maintains that fasting is permitted, and even a mitzvah! They explain that although fasting is inherently sinful, the mitzvah involved outweighs the sin. This is obviously difficult to understand.

R. An-Shlomo Astruc in his Midrashei Ha’Torah adopts a similar position, elaborating that the ‘sin’ requiring ‘atonement’ is not the Nazarite’s abstemiousness itself, but the underlying fact that his urges have become so powerful that he is compelled to become a Nazarite and renounce wine “which cheereth G-d and man” (Shoftim 9:13) in order to subdue his base nature and evil characteristics and eliminate his carnal lusts. He explains that just as some substances are good for the physically healthy but harmful to the ill, so, too, is wine good for the morally healthy but abstention therefrom a tonic for the morally deranged (cf. Gilyonot Nechama year 5710).

The Ramban in his commentary to our parashah sides with the view that Nazarism is praiseworthy. He explains that a Nazarite ideally ought to maintain his elevated status permanently – “he should remain all his days a Nazarite and holy to his G-d” – and that by declining to do so, he commits a grave sin, “and he requires atonement as he returns to becoming defiled by the lusts of the world”.

My parashah lecture, on the same topic, along with accompanying handout, is available at the Internet Archive. [See also our previous posts here and here about the permissibility of cosmetic surgery.]