גדול מרבן שמו

From a Jewish Press interview with R. Nosson Scherman:

[The Jewish Press:] Rabbi Dr. Marcus Lehman’s books [first published in Germany in the 19th century] are saturated with Jewish themes and values. Some of ArtScroll’s books, on the other hand, sometimes seem almost accidentally Jewish. The characters, names and some other details might be Jewish, but otherwise the story seems largely secular. Can you comment?

[Rabbi Scherman:] There’s a shortage of writers. The Orthodox Jewish public is not that big, the well-educated people are not that many and of the ones who are, how many of them are interested in writing books? Lehman was an exception to the rule. He did marvelous things, but how many Marcus Lehmans were there?

Mississippi Fred MacDowell is irritated by the disrespectful use of “Lehman” sans honorific:

Now that R. Marcus Lehman is “Lehman,” TRFKA R. Scherman may as well be Nosson Scherman.

There is nothing new under the sun; the same objection was previously made by one אורי עופר, criticizing in the pages of the Israeli newspaper המודיע the reissuing (or reworking) of R. Lehmann’s fiction under the description “Stories of M. Lehmann”:

אולם עלינו לזכור שהגר”מ להמן זצ”ל היה מגדולי התורה המובהקים לפני יותר מ-100 שנה, וקם ליהדות אשכנז כמושיע רוחני בימי שפל. סיפוריו השיבו לבבות לאבינו שבשמים. דורות שלמים התחנכו על ברכי יצירותיו לחוסן יהודי ואמונה צרופה, לא רק באשכנז המודרנית, אלא גם כן בפולין החסידית לפני השואה –

והנה במשיכת-קולמוס לבוא בימינו ולהעמיד אותו באור חדש: “סיפורי מ. להמן”? לא הרב, לא זצ”ל, סתם איזה מ’ להמן, …1

The main thrust of the controversy in המודיע was actually over the decision to bowdlerize R. Lehman’s novels in order to bring them in line with “the spirit of pure Judaism”. Once again, however, there is nothing new under the sun; Prof. Marc Shapiro notes that discomfort with the “raciness” of R. Lehman’s writing had previously been expressed by no less eminent a figure than Rav Yisrael Salanter:

Rabbi Marcus Lehmann (1831-1890) was a well-known German Orthodox rabbi. He served as rabbi of Mainz and was founder and editor of the Orthodox newspaper Der Israelit. Apart from his scholarly endeavors, he published a series of children’s books, and is best known for that. These were very important as they gave young Orthodox Jews a literature that reflected traditional Jewish values and did not have the Christian themes and references common in secular literature. Yet despite their value for the German Orthodox, R. Israel Salanter was upset when one of Lehmann’s stories (Süss Oppenheimer) was translated into Hebrew and published in the Orthodox paper Ha-Levanon. Although R. Israel recognized that Lehmann’s intentions were pure and that his writings could be of great service to the German Orthodox, it was improper for the East European youth to read Lehmann’s story because there were elements of romantic love in it. This is reported by R. Isaac Jacob Reines, Shnei ha-Meorot, Ma’amar Zikaron ba-Sefer, part 1, p. 46. Here is the relevant passage:

והנה ברור הדבר בעיני כי הרה”צ רמ”ל כיון בהספור הזה לש”ש, ויכול היות כי יפעל מה בספורו זה על האשכנזים בכ”ז לא נאה לפני רב ממדינתינו להעתיק ספור כזה שסוף סוף יש בו מענייני אהבה.

The truth is that that the common view of R. Lehman as a minor figure whose primary claim to fame is his authorship of popular nineteenth century Jewish childrens’ literature does not do the man justice: as both sides in the המודיע debate acknowledge, Rav Dr. Marcus (Meir) Lehmann was widely revered as a גדול בתורה וביראה. Following are a couple of examples of great Torah scholars citing his rulings and policies as authoritative precedent:

רב דוד צבי האפפמאנן

שאלה:

על דבר האילנות והפרחים על הקברים ועל דבר העטרות שעושין למתים.

תשובה:

בעלי המ”ע “איזראעליט” בשבת תרנ”ט בחדש סיון ותמוז נר. 48,51 מובאים פסקים מאת גדולים מו”ר ר’ עזריאל הילדעסהיימער הרב ש”ר הירש והרב מהר”ם לעהמאנן ז”ל שאוסרים פה אחד ומובא שם טעמיהם ונימוקיהם ואין לזוז מפסקם.

ומכל מקום מה שהביאו שם טעם חוקות הגוים לענ”ד אינו נכון על פי [מה] שכתב הריב”ש סימן קנ”ח ומובא בדרכי משה סימן שצ”ג דהליכה לבית הקברות כל בקר מז’ ימי אבילות אינו אסור משום חוקותיהם אף שלקחו מנהג זה מהישמעאלים דאין זה חקה שאין עושין אלא מפני כבוד המת כשם ששורפין על המלכים, שאם באנו לומר כן נאסור גם כן ההספד מפני שהעכו”ם גם כן מספידין עיי”ש.

ומכל מקום שאר הטעמים שכתבו הגאונים הנ”ל מספיקין לאסור ולא יעשה כן בישראל.2

The esteem of R. Lehmann’s slightly younger contemporary and fellow student of Rav Azriel Hildesheimer is perhaps unsurprising; more remarkable is the esteem in which R. Lehmann was held by one of the greatest leaders of Lithuanian Jewry, Rav Chaim Ozer Grodzinski. In 5690 (1930), forty years after R. Lehmann’s death, R. Chaim Ozer was asked by R. Moshe Sofer of Erlau (the יד סופר) about the practice of Der Israelit to explicitly print G-d’s name “in a foreign language”, i.e., German. At the conclusion of a lengthy analysis, R. Chaim Ozer concludes that it would indeed be preferable to alter the practice to avoid doing so, by either substituting for G-d’s name phrases such as “the Eternal Creator”,3 adopting the procedure “practiced by us” of inserting a dash between the letters of G-d’s name (“ג-ט”), or the implementation of some other solution. He then finds it necessary to explain why “הרה”ג הצדיק מוהר”ם לעהמאן ז”ל, the founder of the newspaper fifty years ago”, was not concerned about this, implying that a policy of R. Lehmann has significant precedential value:

ועל כן אם כי היה נכון לכתחלה לשנות ולהביא מלה אחרת כמו דער עוויגער שעפער או לעשות כמו שנהוג אצלנו לעשות קו מפריד בין אות ג’ ואות ט’ או בכל אופן שימצאו עצה לתקן להוציא מידי חשש עוררים, ומה שלא חשש לזה הרה”ג הצדיק מוהר”ם לעהמאן ז”ל המיסד את העתון לפני חמשים שנה, באשר אז היה עתון בכלל דבר חשוב ולא נפוצו בימים ההם העתונים, ונהגו בו מנהג כבוד. מכל מקום אם הדבר קשה אצלם לתקן ולשנות מכפי הנהוג אפשר לצדד דעתון שבועי חשוב כמו “איזראעליט” אינם נוהגים בו מנהג בזיון לפי שיש בו דברי תורה ופסוקים גם בלשון הקודש, ונכון לפרסם בהעתון שלא ינהגו בו מנהג בזיון משום הפסוקים ודברי תורה, ובאופן שיפרסמו כן, ישאר המנהג כמו שהיו נוהגים עד עתה בכתיבת השם בלעז.4

  1. המודיע, הובא על ידי מלך שפירא פה, ועיין שם בתגובה של “יעקב ב.” ד”ה “הנסיך היהודי”‏ []
  2. שו”ת מלמד להועיל מחברת שניה סימן ק”ט. ועיין שו”ת בית שערים יו”ד (כרך ב’) סימן תכ”ח; שו”ת יביע אומר חלק ג’ יו”ד סימן כ”ד [דברי המלמד להועיל הובאו באות י’] וחלק ז’ יו”ד סימן ל”ד אות ג’‏ []
  3. My translation of דער עוויגער שעפער. If this is correct, and if we assume that דער עוויגער שעפער is the German / Yiddish translation of the Hebrew בורא עולם, it would follow that R. Chaim Ozer is interpreting עולם in this context to mean ‘eternal’ rather than ‘universe’. See Prof. Marc Shapiro, What Do Adon Olam and ס”ט Mean ?, for extensive discussion of a related question. []
  4. שו”ת אחיעזר חלק ג’ סימן ל”ב []

Flora and Pfingsten

My weekly פרשה lectures and הלכה column for the past פרשיות אחרי מות-קדושים discussed the Biblical prohibition against “walking in the ordinances” of the Gentiles. As I discuss, a debate over the scope and parameters of this prohibition is apparently behind the controversy over the custom (or family of customs) of the arraying of trees, grasses and flowers in synagogues and homes on Shavuos. I also recently published a detailed article focusing specifically on this custom, its history and its attendant controversy:

View Fullscreen

See also Flowers on Shavuos in Ami Magazine 2 Sivan, 5776 [June 8, 2016] pp. 66-70 and שטיחת עשבים ופרחים והעמדת אילנות בחג השבועות, in והנה רבקה יוצאת – עיונים במדע היהדות לכבוד רבקה דגן, pp. 211-17, both by my friend Eliezer Brodt, and Trees and Flowers on Shavuot: Is it a Pagan Practice or not? (audio) and Flowers and Trees in Shul on Shavuot in Torah To-Go, Shavuot 5777, both by my friend R. Ezra Schwartz.

My column:

In both parashiyos Acharei Mos (18:3) and Kedoshim (20:23), we are prohibited from “walking in the ordinances” of the non-Jews. This prohibition is the basis of a controversy over the custom of decorating synagogues and homes on Shavuos with grasses, trees, and flowers. The Maharil (Hilchos Shavuos) records that (fragrant) grasses and flowers (shoshanim) were arrayed on synagogue floors “for the joy of the holiday”. The Magen Avraham (siman 494 s.k. 4) records the placement of trees in synagogues and homes, which he suggests was intended as a reminder that on Shavuos we are judged regarding the fruits of the trees, and that we should pray for them.

The Gaon of Vilna reportedly opposed and abolished (at least locally) the custom of trees (and perhaps also that of grasses), since in contemporary times, the non-Jews have a similar custom on their holiday of “Pfingsten”, i.e., the Christian Pentecost, which occurs fifty days after Easter Sunday, thus paralleling, and occurring around the same time as, Shavuos, the Jewish Pentecost (Chayei Adam 131(130):13, Chochmas Adam 89:1, Aruch Ha’Shulchan OC 494:6, Shut. Igros Moshe YD 4:11:5).

But while a number of important halachic authorities, particularly within the “Lithuanian” / yeshivah tradition, follow the Gaon’s position, other major authorities reject it, in reliance upon the doctrine that non-Jewish practices are not forbidden as long as they have a rational, legitimate basis. R. Yosef Shaul Nathanson relates that he queried the non-Jews about their reason for the custom, and received a response from “their elder” that it was merely for the purpose of “honor and adornment with beautiful trees”. It therefore has a rational basis and is permitted (Divrei Shaul / Yosef Daas YD #348). R. Shalom Mordechai Schwadron justifies the custom based on the fact that we have a legitimate rationale for it, as a reminder of the judgment regarding the fruits of the trees (Orchos Chaim siman 548 os 8 – see there for an additional basis for leniency). [R. Asher Weiss notes that the Gaon is on record as rejecting the doctrine that the existence of a rational basis legitimizes non-Jewish customs (Biur Ha’Gra YD siman 178 s.k. 7), which explains his stringent position with regard to grasses and trees on Shavuos (Minchas Asher Vayikra 33:2).]

My lectures are available at the Internet Archive. Previous lectures I have given on this topic are also available there: here and here.